Roybal Center for Health Policy Simulation
 
 
 

    Roybal Center for Health Policy Simulation



    The Roybal Center is a collaborative effort between USC and the RAND Corporation. The mission of the Roybal Center for Health Policy Simulation is to develop better models to understand the consequences of biomedical developments and social forces for health, health spending and health care delivery. In 2010, the Roybal Center moved to USC’s Leonard D. Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics. Funded by the National Institute on Aging since 2004, the Roybal Center supports the Future Elderly Model (FEM), a multi-year effort to identify and forecast the consequences of medical breakthroughs over the next 30 years, and the role that regulation plays in promoting or hindering global innovation. The FEM has already begun to shape the national discussion about the role that medical technology will play in explaining health and health care spending. The FEM has also provided the first quantifiable model of the long-run population health consequences of pharmaceutical regulation.


    About the Roybal Center

     

    The goal of the Roybal Center for Health Policy Simulation is to develop better models to understand the consequences of biomedical developments and social forces for health, health spending, and health care delivery. The Center is one of ten established by the National Institute on Aging to move promising social and behavioral research findings out of the laboratory and into programs, practices, and policies that will improve the lives of older people and the capacity of society to adapt to societal aging. The Roybal Center for Health Policy Simulation has several specific aims:

    1. Create a Center that researches new methods for forecasting disease, functional status, and health expenditures of older populations, and that develops decision-making tools based on these methods
    2. Assess how new and existing medical interventions affect the health, functional status, and spending of older cohorts, and their implications for Medicare and Medicaid and society-at-large;
    3. Assess how demographic and public health trends-including obesity, diabetes, and smoking-affect future outcomes for the elderly and society-at-large.

    For more information on the Roybal Center for Health Policy Simulation, go to http://roybal.healthpolicy.usc.edu/