Pitfalls and Potholes: Data Issues to Consider When Conducting Analyses of State Opioid Policies

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Teaching Objectives

  • What is meant by “state opioid policy,” and what gets ignored
  • Sources for state opioid policy data: strengths and limitations of each
  • Considering definitions, and what components of a policy might matter for research purposes
  • Enactment date, effective date, and implementation date – why they matter
  • Making the most of geographic diversity in opioid policies
  • Measuring changes in components, and hence the policy, over time

Agenda (Eastern Time)

1:00 – 1:20 p.m. Introductions & Overview

1:20 – 2:50 p.m. Lessons Related to Policy Data

  • What is “Policy” (examples using PDMP, Morphine Equivalent Doses and NAL laws)
  • Where do people get opioid policy data? Does source matter?
  • Examples of differences across sources: definitions & interpretations

2:50 – 3:00 p.m. Break

3:00 – 4:00 p.m. Considering “Time”

  • Enactment date versus effective date versus implementation date
  • Transition in policy components over time; why does it matter?
  • Identification in a dynamic policy world

4:00 – 4:30 p.m.: Wrap Up and where to go for more information

Register for This Program

Space is limited. Please register online by Monday, September 7, 2020.

Event Date
Monday, September 14, 2020
1:00 PM - 4:30 PM Eastern
Location

Facilitator

Bradley Stein, MD, PhD
Senior Physician Policy Researcher, RAND Corporation
Adjunct Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh

Panelists

Rosalie Liccardo Pacula, PhD
Elizabeth Garrett Chair in Health Policy, Economics & Law and Professor of Health Policy and Management, USC Sol Price School of Public Policy
Senior Fellow, USC Schaeffer Center for Health Policy & Economics

Rosanna Smart, PhD
Economist, RAND Corporation

 

Tisamarie Sherry, MD, PhD
Associate Physician Policy Researcher, RAND Corporation

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